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historians, including the woman who wrote the book on lincoln. >> the white house will hold a private swearing in ceremony for president obama. not to be outdone, on sunday, republicans will hold a private swearing at ceremony for president obama. nasal congestion? relieve sure don't you? [ nyquil bottle ] dude! [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. [heart beating] [heartbeat continues] [heartbeat, music playing louder] ♪ i'm feeling better since you know me... ♪ announcer: this song was created with heartbeats of children in need. find out how it can help frontline health workers bring hope to millions of children at everybeatmatters.org. >> i barack hussein obama do solemn my swear -- >> i barack hussein obama do solemn my swear -- >> that i will execute faithfully the office of presidency of the united states. >> a famous club during the last inauguration. by monday afternoon, they will have recited the oath of office together four times. only fdr with match that. joining me now, doug brinkley and d
the woman who wrote the book on lincoln. >> the white house will hold a private swearing in ceremony for president obama. not to be outdone, on sunday, republicans will hold a private swearing at ceremony for president obama. ♪ hi dad. many years from now, when the subaru is theirs... hey. you missed a spot. ...i'll look back on this day and laugh. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. to volunteer to help those in need. when a twinge of back pain surprises him. morning starts in high spirits, but there's a growing pain in his lower back. as lines grow longer, his pain continues to linger. but after a long day of helping others, he gets some helpful advice. just two aleve have the strength to keep back pain away all day. today, jason chose aleve. just two pills for all day pain relief. try aleve d for strong, all day long sinus and headache relief. try aleve d for strong, all day long (announcer) scottrade knows our and invest their own way. with scottrade's smart text, i can quickly understand my charts, and spend more time trading. their quick trade bar lets my account follow
touches on it. >> we were talking about a lot of references to the 701 words by abraham lincoln. >> first of all, and there are not a heck of a lot of second inaugural addresses out there. lincoln's definitely stand out. possibly george w. bush. so much has happened in his first term. it was such a different picture international arena than it was at the beginning of his first term. >> the second inaugural address was longer than the first. >> we have quite a challenge with president clinton. the second address was rather long. he had a way with the audience. i think he made up for it with his delivery. he was very captivating with people. i think inaugural addresses and typically tended to be shorter than other major presidential addresses. it is a moment of national unity. it is that a moment to lay out a detailed policy agenda. it is much more rhetorical and poetic. >> the president will deliver his state of union address. >> that will be his policy agenda. it will also be a speech that makes a lot more news than the inaugural address. the inaugural address kind of comes and goes. the
not always work out well for vice presidents. in 1865, lincoln's second term, that's significant speech will remember -- that magnificent speech, healing speech -- his vice president was ander johnsorew johnson. affusion ticket in 1864 -- a fusion ticket in 1864. johnson arrived with the flu. he gave, for what it was all accounts, a completely inebriated address. lincoln was mortified. it said the public image -- set the public image of andrew johnson. another disastrous vice- presidential inaugural address was calvin coolidge's. he used that opportunity to state and how the filibuster should be done away with. president roosevelt's second inauguration, that is when the congress started before the president. now presidents and vice presidents began to be sworn outside of the steps. there was one exception in the long tradition of inauguration's being held in the capital. that was in 1945, when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. he was the only president of united states to serve more than two terms. his third inauguration was of the capital. his fourth one was in t
and awarded a presidential medal of arts and lincoln medal. she joins me with douglas brinkley. welcome to you, doctor angelou. how are you? >> i'm splendid, thank you. and you? >> i'm extremely honored to be talking to you, actually. i mean that very sincerely. i want to remind you of an e-mail on behalf of the president talking about a conversations you had with dr. martin luther king and of course tomorrow is mlk day. it couldn't be a more appropriate day. i'm sure you would feel for barack obama's second inauguration. but in those conversations with martin luther king, he felt there may be an african-american president, the first black president in the next 40 years. you didn't think it would happen in your lifetime. >> it's -- that's true. i'm so excited. i'm so happy about my country. that we are growing up. >> and how do you think the president -- >> we are moving beyond ignorance. >> right. how do you think. >> sorry? >> how do you think he's done, president obama, in the first term and what would you like him to do more of in his second term? >> well, i think he's done the best he cou
memorable moments. she was awarded the lincoln medal in 2008. she joins me along with douglas brinkley. how are you? >> i'm good and you. >> i want to remind you of an e-mail that you sent out. you talked about conversations you had with dr. martin luther king. tomorrow is mlk day. it couldn't be a more appropriate day i'm sure you would feel for barack obama's second inauguration. in those conversations he felt there may be an african-american president, first black president in the next 40 years. you didn't think it would happen in your lifetime. >> that's true. i'm so excited. i'm so happy about my country that we are growing up. >> how do you think the president -- >> we're growing beyond our ignorance. >> how do you think he's done in his first term and what would you like him to do more of in his second term? >> well, i think he's done the best he could. i think that there were a number of people who as soon as he was elected put their feet down, their heels into the earth and said no matter what he does, no matter how good he is, i will not support him. i will resist his attempts to
of martin luther king and abraham lincoln. this is martin luther king day. we celebrate that, as well. the second time a president has been inaugurated on martin luther king day. about 800,000 people will be there on the mall. a little bit smaller than four years ago. but no less buoyant. a lot of smiling faces out there. we hear the choir of p.s. 22 in staten island. >> they are the largest choir in staten island. and i believe they are fifth graders. let's listen to them for a second. ♪ don't pay no mind to the feeling, until you feel it ♪ >> we love the caps. we love the swaying this morning. we've been thinking to ourselves, a second inauguration is typically not as -- not as surprising as the first inauguration. but nonetheless, it rededicates this country to big ideas. and the person who has to do it in his speech, walking up to the podium, is the president. we saw the first family walking in to st. john's church earlier this morning. >> they're at that worship service right now. there they are, right there, just before they walked into st. john's episcopal church, across th
lincoln noted in the first inauguration address, first, one section of our country slavery is right while the other believes it's wrong and ought to be extended. -- sorry and ought not to be extended. it's the only substantial dispute. period. close quote. the president of the confederate states of america, jefferson davis reminded his congress in 1861, these are his words, a labor of african slaves was and independenceble to our prosperity. so with the interest of such overwhelming magnitude imperilled by the election to the presidency of antislavery man like abraham lincoln, he went, the people of the southern states he said were driven to the adoption and song course of action to avert the danger with which they were openly men answered. and that course of action, of course, was leaving the federal union. davis was not overstating the stakes for him and fellow slave owners. the more than 12 million soul who was resided in the southern states in 1860, nearly one out of three of those people was enslaved. was owned outright by other people. and on the market of the day, those nearly 4 mi
inaugural addresses and a lot of references to lincoln's second saturday much more famous than his first address but that is the exception. guest: i suppose it is. there aren't a lot of inaugural addresses out there. but lincoln's definitely stands out. i'm trying to think offhand whose president's second inaugural address resinated more than the first. possibly my president, george bush. because it was such a different picture at the second term than at the beginning of his first. host: both of you bush, 43, president blin's second inaugural address was longer than the first. guest: yes, we had quite a challenge with president clinton. as most people know, he tends to like to speak long. the second address was rather long but, you know, he had a way with the audience and i think he made up for it with the delivery and he was captivating with people. although, i think a normal address typically tend to be shorter than other major presidential addresses. it is a moment of national unity, it is not a moment to lay out a detailed policy agenda. so, you know, it is more rhetorical and poetic
address in history is the second inaugural address which is lincoln which some people say surpasses the gettysburg address. it's the best lay sermon no history. >> and dr. jill bide ep is accompanied by honey alexander, the wife of senator lamar alexander. and by debby boehner, wife of house speaker john boehner. sorry to interrupt you there. >> more recently, you may disagree with the content and the tone but no one will dispute the fact that george w. bush was aiming for the bleachers with his second inaugural with what he called his freedom speech which is -- in terms of projecting american force, moral and military around the world in the wake of 9/11 and the doctrine of preemptive military action. >> you knows the reference to lincoln, we talk about being in a divided america now. in many ways we are politically. but you think about lincoln and that inauguration, both of his, it was a different level. >> different level all together. he is involved in the conflict where half a million people would be killed, the end of channeled slavery. a lot is at stake. we're fighting now bu
, richard nixon, to eisenhower, fdr, woodrow wilson, william mckinley, ulysses s. grant, abraham lincoln, anger jackson, james monroe, james madison, thomas jefferson, and george washington. down on the national mall where the crowds are gathering, we have a reporter in the middle of everything. >> right from a capital, in the middle of the national mall, three ladies with us and make the journey to this and operation. >> i am gloria, from seattle. >> michelle, new york. >> marion, pennsylvania. >> you decided to meet here. >> we are all three sisters. >> why did you decide to come to washington for the 57 and operation? >> i think we regretted not being here quarter years ago. we decided we would not miss it this time around. >> we never thought about it or we did not think it is possible to come altogether. >> how did this all happened? how did each of you get here? >> i drove up from pennsylvania. >> i flew in. >> gives me an average cost of how much this will come to, the bill to be here in washington and to stay overnight. >> probably over $2,000. hotel're able to find a and do all
this kind of insanity -- this kind of material. this happens to be the abraham lincoln inauguration, documenting that formal sense, but there is a quality to these inaugurations that are very important because the tone is very carefully constructed, often. sometimes you lose your control, such as with polk, but often times everybody knows that every aspect of an inauguration will be examined for meaning, what is being said, the undercurrents -- do you ride up to the capital in a carriage in splendor? do you walk back as a man of the people, as jimmy carter did? there is careful balance. when you look at some of this material, you can see over time that, in fact, they are carefully crafting it as well. i have always been amazed in looking at jimmy carter's inaugural serial, how informal his material tends to be compared to other presidents, and it is clearly a statement that following the nixon years, the imperial presidency, they were going to have a residency of the people -- presidency of the people. you notice that on his tickets, rather than having an inaugural ball, he has an i
by chance. when lincoln creates -- lincoln creates some really great was but one of the first words he thought about secession. he said that secession is the sugar coating, the impact of this country. lincoln when he first used sugarcoated, the printers of the united states comes to lincoln and said we cannot put this in the official record, the word sugarcoated. and lincoln says i can't imagine any american not knowing what you're saying. lincoln was also, again i'm going back to william safire's influence, one of the first uses of cool, not innocent of temperature but in the sense of being callous, he said, something he said that was cool. that was callous. it was a behavioral thing. so again, those are, a word like cool. obama could come up with a new name of cool. that's another thing. one word and you give it different many. as i said with all these different meanings. and how i did this was i did a lot of reading and i get a lot of use of huge proprietary databases at the library of congress. 19th century database where you can find the original document in which 1807 when jeffer
foundation. >>> next, rush limbaugh has a theory about why so many on the left are fans of the movie "lincoln." >> why is bill clinton out there at the golden globes last night being brought on stage to thunderous standing ovations to talk about lincoln and what he did during -- what did lincoln do? as far as these people are concerned, he wiped out the south. but he didn't finish, so what the left is admitting today that they are doing is once -- trying to finish it off. lincoln did not fully finish. they're all focused on gods and guns in the south. they love both of them. and so the south has to be wiped out again. i'm telling you, essentially there is an all-out effort being made to marginalize conservatism. >> reminds me of radio rwanda in the bad old days. it's been far right republicans obviously doing all the civil war talk. they're the ones talking about the civil war, about nullification of federal laws and all the secession petitions out there. >>> before house republicans head off for their annual retreat this week, i think it's in williamsburg, the democratic congressional campai
to president lincoln and dr. king president obama wants to remind the nation of its traditions. >> the inauguration reminds us of the role that we have as fellow citizens in promoting a common good. >> reporter: now today is a day of service in honor of dr. king. monday, the swearing in, the celebration, and then when the party's over after the inaugural balls on monday night, it will be back to the same battles and the hope that it won't be just business as usual. rebecca, anthony? >> bill plante at the white house. thank you, bill. >>> while the president's opponents are observing the traditional truths to the inauguration, can president obama hope for a new term. let's talk with debbie wassermann schultz. >> good morning. thanks for having me. >> congresswoman, let me ask you. we heard from theepublicans on extending the debt ceiling for at least a three-month period. is this any signs of hope in terms of cooperation or more maneuvering? >> i think this unfortunately more a sign that republicans realize it was horribly damaging to them to continue to
was by abraham lincoln. guest: there are people who thinks that it outranks the gettysburg address. it is the greatest way sermon ever delivered in america. anyone who questions lincoln's spirituality as opposed to his denominational membership, read the second inaugural. it is a remarkable addressed for its eloquence. for the message. at that point, clearly the war is almost over. the obvious thing to do would- be self congratulations. guest: that is the magnanimous side. until the crime of human slavery was removed from the american landscape, the united states would not be right with god. it is an extraordinarily spiritual address. with malice toward none,lincoln was looking ahead to reconstruction. host: this morning in the "new york times," the historian one of a number of people offering advice for the president's second speech. guest: i would not offer advice to the president. the second inaugural is one of the more inaugurable addresses. fdr acknowledges that for all the progress made, remember the famous line -- clothed, ill fed. he was acknowledging unfinished business. h
's not unprecedented. three presidents in the past have done the same. the first belonged to president lincoln. he used it in his swearing-in in 1861. and the second belonged to martin luther king jr. it was his traveling bible and it's fitting because today is martin luther king day. after the swearing-in, the president and the first lady family and friends, congressional leaders all head in to statuary hall for lunch. this is a tradition that dates back to 1889. they'll dine on bison and good old-fashioned apple pie. >> we go to chief correspondent and host of "face the nation" bob schieffer. he's covering his 12th inaugurations. good morning. >> actually it's 13. i came to lbj's with my mom. she got an invitation. the first one i covered, you're absolutely right, was 1968. and hearing robert gibbs talk about he will stress togetherness and trying to you know, heal this partisan divide it made me think of theodore roosevelt in his inaugural speech. he said at one point our relations with other powers are important, he said, but even more important are our relations among o
spoke them. abraham lincoln with malice toward none, charity for all, let us strive to finish the work we are in to bind up the nation's wounds. john f. kennedy asked not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. franklin roosevelt, let me assert my firm believe that the only thing we have to fear is fear it itself. >> what makes a speech a part of history and what does this president need to say tomorrow as he begins his second term joining us are michael gerson speechwriter for president bush and james fallis, speechwriter to president carter. you say you don't write to be etched in granite, but i know that writers know when words ring. when you put words on paper, you think, i can see this, you know, as being what will be taken from this speech. so how do you craft those? >> it's true. the chair richter version is the state of the union address. i think with the inaugural address it's harder because something that registers as a showy line may come off as too showy. i think my sense of inaugural addresses the more they are poem like, the more they are s
one. >> of course, there was lincoln's second inaugural where he talked about the wounds of the nation. we know that the president has been working on this president for weeks and major garrett, our chief white house correspondent, is at the white house this morning with a little bit of insight on what we might hear today. >> well, good morning, scott. those closest to the president tell us this speech is in the moment and it's going to talk, they hope, credibly, believably about responsibilities ahead. and the prospect for not only bipartisan compromise, and things that didn't seem achievable four years ago. it might be worth reminding us ourselves how the president ended first inaugural address four years ago. scott, the president talked about america being in the midst of a winter of our hardship and he urged the nation to brave icy currents and to endure whatever storms may come. there was a sense of forboding then, a sense of crisis, both economic and otherwise, that white house advisers that he feels is no longer as present now as it was then. so that's part of the optimistic not
lincoln. when harry truman was worrying about firing mcarthur, he's reading about mcclellan, what did lincoln do about mcclellan. you think about your own life, learn from your own experiences. he will have learned from this fist term an enormous set of things to take with him to the second term, strengthed and weaknesses. but you can learn from all these guys before you, like learning from your grandparents and great grandparents. great when a president cares about history. >> give me a measure, michael, of how much this president is attuned to history, how much it plays a part of his lady life. i know i've read he tries to find up to three hours a day and night between 9:00 and midnight to read. >> he is above all a writer, so not surprising given what this is his day job is. but, you know, i think the most revealing thing was just after the election he gave that press conference and was asked about second terms. you remember? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term ove
. >> "new york times" best-selling author of lincoln biography "team of rivals" doris kearns goodwin in between awards shows has joined us. and nbc news special correspondent tom brokaw. welcome to all of you. tom, that's where we tee it up. the president, as he begins a second term, very difficult climate in washington and very real expectations. >> yes. and i was looking at those top three priorities for the american people. and they all fit into his single most difficult task, it seems to me, both conceptually and specifically. in the next couple of years, he only has a couple of years, these are second terms and not four-year terms. you're running right up to the mid-term election frankly. there's a desperate need for the country going forward to do something about tax reform and entitlements sitting under the umbrella of fixing the economy and creating near jobs and stopping spending. that's going to be tough. we have been giving people things for a long time. now they'll have to reel them in and fine tune them, and that will take an exceptional hand in the white house to pull t
this movie on lincoln, the recent movie on lincoln and the lesson of that movie, i think was, when hard things get done, they get done because a president decided he was going to do what was necessary to get them done and that means you have to realistically look at the world you live in and the washington you have been given by the american voters to work with. >> chris: let's talk about some of the specific items that will be on your agenda. what do you think of the new house republican plan to pass a short-term extension of the debt limit until april and in the meantime, insist that the senate pass a budget or all of you lose your pay. >> i think all of us losing our pay if we don't pass the budget is the right thing to do. i'm for sutzing spending, passing the budget is not quite enough, but at least it is a step in the right direction. if you went to your credit counselor and said, i can't pay my bills, he wouldn't say, we'll extend your limit, he'd say, what will you do to pay your bills in the future and a budget is a big step toward doing that. one of the frustrations i think of
in to be -- for a second term, wolf. >> tomorrow, he'll have dr. martin luther king, jr. bible and abraham lincoln's bible at the official public ceremony at the white house. you're looking at live pictures. we're about to go into the blue room of the united states. the president of the united states and his family, they will be there together with the chief justice of the united states, john roberts. he will administer the oath as we get ready for this historic moment. >> please raise your right hand and repeat after me. i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear. >> i barack hussein obama, do solemnly swear. >> that i will faithfully execute. >> that i will faithfully execute. >> the office of president of the united states. >> the office of president of the united states. >> and will, to the best of moo i ability. >> and will, to the best of my ability. >> preserve, protect and defend. >> preserve, protect and defend. >> the constitution of the united states. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> congratulations mr. president. >> thank you, mr. chief justice.
goodwin later on. what is the chance he doesn't quote lincoln's second inaugural? >> i would be shocked if lincoln is not quoted. i would be shocked if specific issues aren't mentioned. that doesn't mean he isn't going to talk about newtown. but as far as talking about guns and gun control, he's got a state of the union in three weeks. advisers continue to remind us of that. hey, this is not a laundry list of things he wants to get done. yes, he has a small window. i think savannah is right, i think we'll be able to judge by the fourth of july of this year, has he gotten one of his gun proposals passed through congress, is immigration done? all of those things, if he can get them done, probably need to get done by the summer. but today's speech knot for that. that's that state of the union which takes place in three weeks. >> all right. chuck todd in front of reviewing stand. we want to show you, especially those just joining us the kind of calendar of events, the schedule upcoming. right now, the president is hosting congressional leaders inside the white house for a kind of traditiona
figures i admire probably more than anybody in american history is dr. king and president lincoln. for me to have the opportunity to use the bible they used on the 105th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation and the 50th anniversary of the march on washington is fitting. their actions and the movement they represent are the only reason that it is possible for me to be inaugurated. it is also a reminder for me that this country has gone through tough times before but we always come out on the other side. we're constantly perfecting our union and making it more fair. we want everybody to have a fair shot in this country. if you work hard, you can make it. regardless of where you come from or what you look like. it is probably the most important thing to keep in mind when you are president of the united states. i will uphold my oath of office at the same time letting me remind people of the sacrifices of the past. from the presidential inaugural committee host: first lady michelle obama just turned 49 last week. she will have a big role during the next couple of days. here is take twe
luther king jr. and the other abraham lincoln. supreme court justice warren vice- president joe biden for his second term >> the joseph biden jr. solemn we swear that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states >> he also unofficially took the oath of office yesterday. president obama expressed hope for the future in his inaugural address. he called for fidelity to our founding principles. while also increasing your responses to new challenges. >> a decade of war is now ending. ifan economic recovery has begun. we possess all of the >> hughes in drive. diversity and open this. endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. >> the president will be presenting more details of his second term policy goals. he said the nation must confront the needs of a rising middle class. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid, these things did not stab our nation a strengthen us. they did not make us a nation of takers. a free us to take the risk that makes this country great. >> for a reaction we're joined by frank holland. >> the n
-american manager of a moody bible. and he will use that, and tomorrow, the bible that abraham lincoln used on his inauguration and one used by martin luther king. there you have it, a shot of the blue room, aptly named. >> this is a look inside the white house with chief justice john roberts. let's listen in to the white house for swearing-in of president barack obama. >> please, raise yush right hand and repeat after me, i barack, husays obama do solemnly swear hay will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect and defend... the constitution of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> thank you mr. chief justice. thank you so much. [applause] >> thank you. >> i did it. all right. thank you, everybody. >> and with that, president obam has started his second term. it's amazing to watch. you saw the president enter the second term, the 44th president of the united states with a swearing-in by the chief justice and megyn kelley. >> i owe wallace a quarter. >> he did use the
think, is that if you educate the country -- you know, when he talked to you, he mentioned lincoln's quote. there's a second sentence to lincoln's quote. lincoln's first quote was without public opinion, nothing can happen, but with it, he who holds sentiment goes deeper than he who makes laws. i think the second term what he understand from the first term is he was inside washington too much. you have to use the bully pulpit. you have to get out among the people. you have to mobilize. he has a base out there, a coalition that voted for him, pretty actively came to the polls. and the best presidents have been able to mobilize pressure from the outside in. and what four years has told him, maybe he's tried to get republicans over. some of them don't come. he should keep trying. and he has to really keep trying with the democrats. i agree. those are the ones he should schmooze. whatever that word is. i didn't say it right. >> don't pretend you don't know it. >> it is between smooch and -- exactly. >> richard, i want to pick up on that point. >> although that sounds very good, of cour
for being with us. the most memorable second term address was by abraham lincoln. guest: people think that it outranked the gettysburg address. i would say it is the greatest lay sermon delivered in america. anyone who questioned his spirituality, read the second inaugural. it is a remarkable address. it is not a celebratory speech. at that point, the war is almost over. the most obvious thing to do would be some congratulations. host: with malice toward none. guest: that is the magnanimous side. until the crime of human slavery was removed from the american landscape, the united states would not be right with god. it is an extraordinarily spiritual address. lincoln was looking ahead to reconstruction. host: this morning in the "new york times," the historian one of a number of people offering advice for the president's second speech. guest: i would not offer advice to the president. the second inaugural is one of the more inaugurable addresses. i see a country one-third ill clothed, ill fed. host: as the author of the book "patriarch," he delivered the first second inaugural address.
to be photographed. during lincoln's second inaugural was the first to have african americans to take part. president george w. bush became the nation's 43rd president on january 20, 2001 after defeating al gore that ended in a supreme court decision in december of that year. the enaugust ration was attended by 3,000 people. this is about a 15 minutes. [applause] >> are you ready to take the oath? i, george walker bush do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help me god. congratulations. [applause] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states, george w. bush. [applause] >> president clinton, distinguished guests and my fellow citizens, the peaceful transfer of authority is rare in history, yet common in our country. with a simple oath, we affirm old traditions and make new beginnings. as i begin, i thank president clinton for his service to our nation. [applause] and i thank vice president gore for a contest co
birthday and mine. >> eric: robert, president obama sworn in today with two bibles. one was abraham lincoln's and the second belonged to reverend leon, b., john f.be kennedy, dr. martin luther king junior or jeremiah wright. that is for you. >> kimberly: i think all the answers are "c" today. >> eric: he was sworn in on two bibles. dana, this is for you. stop cheating. five flags for flown at the capitol today. two of betsy ross colonials and one was the current flag and the other two. do we have a picture of that, by the way? >> kimberly: other two? >> eric: five flags. in the middle is the u.s. flag. and then betsy ross colonials. what are the two straddling the other? state of illinois when admitted to the union? or "b," when the state of hawaii was admitted -- >> greg: never happened. >> eric: "c," washington, d.c., made the capital. or afl-cio. >> dana: one is illinois. >> eric: they are both the united states flag of illinois. who was sworn in, global warming that you like to talk about. who is sworn in with the warmest temperature at the inauguration? >> greg: ronald reagan. >> eric:
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 103 (some duplicates have been removed)